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coupersetique denpa
Wed, Jan. 1st, 2014 02:51 pm


http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAIjZr9h65bAsTW588avDeHxCIcf2T-h1

I'm sorry I couldn't embed the youtube playlist. It contains the dozen or so songs that are not on spotify.

I am sure you'll find something to like/hate/be offended by. Good luck in the New Year. Best album was Serafina Steer's Lady Fortune. I am sure I will love the new Childish Gambino, San Fermin, Lorde, and Perera Elsewhere albums a ton once I spend some time with them.

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Thu, Nov. 7th, 2013 09:21 pm


Because I still love you.

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Thu, Aug. 1st, 2013 08:58 pm
The playlist version of a school dance from my high school from 1990-1992:


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Thu, Feb. 7th, 2013 09:11 pm

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Mon, Feb. 4th, 2013 06:56 pm


Songs that came from albums that I liked/owned for the first time in 2012 that didn't make my 'favorite songs' playlist. Or not. I think in the end I just didn't want to spend all day figuring out what whas on what playlist. My favorite albums last year were The Dirty Projectors Swing Lo Magellan, Quantic and Alice Russell's Look Around the Corner, and Alt+J's An Awesome Wave. I think most of my friends would really enjoy Tame Impalas, Moses Hightower, and Django Django.

Also if you didn't give Norah Jones' Little Broken Hearts a chance, you should. The production is EPIC.

I know this is late, but not nearly as late as last time. THANKS.

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Tue, Jan. 1st, 2013 09:42 pm
Part 2



In no particular order, the songs that weren't anywhere on spotify

Dunson – Count On It
The Hood Internet – Polish City (Tyga vs Neon Indian)
Big Soul – La Belle Et La Bete
Jj – STILL
Possimiste – Clockworkbird
Son Lux – Resound
Miss Bank$ – Seventeen
Azealia Banks – Out of Space
The Hood Internet – It's E.S.P. Bitches (Swizz Beats vs Deerhoof)
Diplo – About That Life feat. Jahan Lennon
Matthew Dear – Earthforms (Michna Remix)
Kasabian – The Sweet Escape (Originally By Gwen Stefani Feat. Akon)
wait what – the new karate workout (kanye west vs kennedy)

Plus the one song that was nowhere else is number nine in the compilation linked below.
George Fishoff Complex - Ping Pong
http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2007/06/cool_and_strang.html

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Tue, Jan. 1st, 2013 09:41 pm
Part 1, everything from spotify


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Sun, Dec. 16th, 2012 12:33 pm
Monster by Walter Dean Myers

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Short novel about the trial of an African American boy accused of murder. Written mostly in screenplay format. I feel like this book covers a lot of important themes, but I really wasn't into the format. The segments written in a first person style seemed less distant and more engaging to me.

You're a Horrible Person, But I Like You: The Believer Book of Advice by Eric Spitznagel

My rating: 2 of 5 stars
Famous funny people answer letters in a literary magazine with fake advice. Considering HOW well known most of these people are, it's surprising how not very funny and kind of mean the book is.

Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World by Michael Lewis

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Lewis's take on the financial crisis in Europe (Iceland, Greece, Ireland, and Germany) and California, from a series of Vanity Fair articles. The articles are apparently available free online. There are a lot of generalizations about the cultures of each country. It is not really that in depth on any one topic. Also, a lot of the information I had also covered via NPR's Planet Money podcast. That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy knowing a little more about Mount Athos and finding out about the book "Life is Like a Chicken Coop Ladder" which is apparently a whole book all about Germany's fascination with poop. It was fun to read, but not my favorite of Lewis' works.

Lost At Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries by Jon Ronson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Ronson's book on what we are willing to believe in. Insane Clown Posse, The Alpha Course, Indigo Children, interviews with robots, Stanley Kubrick's rooms full of boxes (my favorite by far), SETI, cheating on Millionaire, child molesters, not so picky euthanasia advocates, what people in various income brackets believe about themselves and others, how companies target mailings/calls, and how things go desperately wrong for ordinary people. This is more loosely themed than my favorite Ronson books, but it is still an interesting read.

The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible by A.J. Jacobs

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Jacobs, who is a compulsive mostly secular Jewish person, decides to live (literally) according to the Old and New Testament. He asks religious leaders to help him decipher the rules of the bible. They (and he) don't agree with each other, but his journey highlights the place where religious rules come from and how religious people think and live. I learned about how there is a spectrum of interpretation, how hard it would be to follow every rule, how much variety there is among fundamentalist views and communities (Jacobs says people portray fundamentalists as pretty crazy, but mostly they are pretty normal people), and a little bit about Hasidism. It's fun to read about Jacobs' struggles with the rules, how he deals with his family (and job), and other people's reactions to him.

View all my reviews

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Sat, Dec. 15th, 2012 10:37 pm
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
I was surprised at how not terrible this book was. In retrospect, maybe I shouldn't have been. As a Cold War baby I have a lot of love for dystopian books. It is VERY PLOTTY. Apparently the author is a seasoned tv writer. It shows in how the book is structured, paced, and is at the perfect reading level for the intended audience. If you liked this book, The Hunger Games is somewhat like Battle Royale (BR is older and gorier... and Japanese.)

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
I can't really say a lot without wrecking the first book, which this is a continuation of. I do like this. It feels, in e-book format, as if they should all be part of the same book, because they are so quick to read. In reality an all in one volume would be a thumb buster. It isn't as deeply satisfying as The Handmaid's Tale but
it's still fun (as far as dystopian books can be fun.)

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
I can't say a lot about this book without spoilers... I think the pacing got uneven, to where I felt like parts of the book went on for a long time and then the ending was over very quickly. I enjoyed how it showed the overall ambiguous morality of some of the 'good guys.' Overall I enjoyed the series.

Spitfire by Annette Sandoval
My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Sandoval's novel about a quirky, sarcastic admin at a law office who becomes a suspect after one of her friends with benefits is murdered. This book is pretty much light suspense/mystery/romance. It's the narration of the main character that makes it an entertaining read, if you do not like her, you will not like the book. I have to admit, she had me at 'makes videos of lame pick up lines.'

The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups, and Winning at All Costs by Tyler Hamilton
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Tyler Hamilton's personal account of doping in the world of cycling, including his time on the Postal team with Lance Armstrong. Fascinating, if you're interested in the subject matter at all. There's a fair amount of descriptions of injections and bloodwork, if you are squeamish.

View all my reviews

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Sat, Dec. 15th, 2012 09:31 pm
Tour De France For Dummies (For Dummies) by Phil Liggett

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Book about the Tour de France, the only sporting event I have ever bought PPV access to. (I went a bit mad, but seriously it's NOT THAT EXPENSIVE.) I wanted, I think, about twice as many deeply detailed descriptions of how things work, because that is the type of reader I am. The chapters are written so that you can read one at a time, as you feel the urge, but it ends up feeling like things get re-explained multiple times because of it. Also, because the book was written a few years ago, the tv coverage information is wrong, and they explain what text messages and internet search engines are as if you do not know already. All of that being said, I did learn more about the Tour, which was my goal.

You Can Run But You Can't Hide by Duane Chapman

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Dog the Bounty Hunter's memoir of his journey from abused but Jesus loving child, to outlaw biker, to bounty hunter, to drug addict, to redemption. Not particularly well written, but definitely an interesting life to read about.

In the Devil's Garden: A Sinful History of Forbidden Food by Stewart Lee Allen

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Book linking food and the seven deadly sins. Very interesting. It is obvious if you are well read about any one of the many topics he discusses that not everything is 100% accurate. As an example he talks about Marie Antoinette's famous 'cake' quote as referring to brioche, but as far as anyone can tell, Marie Antoinette never said anything about letting anyone eat either cake or brioche.

Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin D. Mitnick

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Mitnick's memoir about his time hacking phones and computers and the legal consequences of his actions. A lot more social engineering than I expected. I am kind of split on this book, having been alternately both fascinated and bored by his exploits. I am a person who loves detail on exactly how things happen and work, but at times, there was just too much of it for me. Also, I wasn't expecting Mitnick to be exactly sorry for what he did (he isn't), but there's an aspect of him that is compulsive, his overall motivations as a human being are not something I can relate to, and he's sort of grandiose. In other words, I don't really like him.

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Re-read. First read sometime in the eighties. Of Raskin's books, this is the most well known. Twelve heirs are paired off to solve the mystery of paper magnate Samuel Westing. This is the most 'normal' of Raskin's books, which is probably why it isn't my overall favorite. I love that the kids in the book are well adjusted and together and the adults are mostly pretty screwed up people. Turtle Wexler is probably one of my favorite literary characters of all time.

Just as a side note, if you are a fan, at least one book acquired from Raskin's estate (A Murder for Macaroni and Cheese) may finally be seeing the light of day next year. I don't know why it has taken so long, honestly, she passed away before I hit puberty (well over twenty years ago.)

If you like Raskin, you can hear her explain the book here:
http://www.education.wisc.edu/ccbc/au...

Other Raskin items worth reading:
http://blog.schoollibraryjournal.com/...
http://www.education.wisc.edu/ccbc/au...
http://bookshelvesofdoom.blogs.com/bo...

View all my reviews

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